Treatments & Services

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An aortogram involves placement of a catheter in the aorta and injection of contrast material while taking x-rays of the aorta. The procedure is known as aortography. The diagnosis of aortic dissection can be made by visualization of the intimal flap and flow of contrast material in both the true lumen and the false lumen. The catheter has to be inserted through the right femoral artery, because in about two thirds of cases the aortic dissection spreads into the left common iliac artery. The aortogram was previously considered the gold standard test for the diagnosis of aortic dissection, with a sensitivity of up to 88% and a specificity of about 94%.


A Fistulogram or Sinogram is an x-ray procedure to view an abnormal passage (fistula/sinus) between two or more organs. It may include a passage from inside the body, to an opening on the skin. Contrast (once called as x-ray dye) is used to identify the start of the fistula/si nus, its pathway and what organs are involved.


Venography (also called phlebography or ascending phlebography) is a procedure in which an x-ray of the veins, a venogram, is taken after a special dye is injected into the bone marrow or veins. The dye has to be injected constantly via a catheter, making it an invasive procedure. Normally the catheter is inserted by the groin and moved to the appropriate site by navigating through the vascular system. Venography can also be used to distinguish blood clots from obstructions in the veins, to evaluate congenital vein problems, to see how the deep leg vein valves are working, or to identify a vein for arterial bypass grafting.

IVC Filter Removals

An inferior vena cava filter (IVC filter) is a type of vascular filter, a medical device that is implanted by interventional radiologists or vascular surgeons into the inferior vena cava to presumably prevent life-threatening pulmonary emboli (PEs).

Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion, Exchange & Removal

In medicine, hemodialysis (also haemodialysis) is a method that is used to achieve the extracorporeal removal of waste products such as creatinine and urea and free water from the blood when the kidneys are in a state of renal failure.

Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA)

Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a medical procedure in which part of the electrical conduction system of the heart, tumor or other dysfunctional tissue is ablated using the heat generated from high frequency alternating current (in the range of 350–500 kHz. Two important advantages of RF current (over previously used low frequency AC or pulses of DC) are that it does not directly stimulate nerves or heart muscle and therefore can often be used without the need for general anesthetic, and that it is very specific for treating the desired tissue without significant collateral damage.


The procedure involves the removal of the varicose veins through multiple small 2–3 mm incisions in the skin overlying the varicose veins. First the veins are marked with the patient in standing position. The phlebectomy hook is inserted through an incision and the varicose veins is hooked, extracted, and subsequently fixed with a clamp (e.g. Mosquito clamp). Next the vein is pulled out by turning or “wenching” the exteriorized part of the vein and moving the clamps as the vein is pulled out further.


Sclerotherapy is a procedure used to treat blood vessels or blood vessel malformations (vascular malformations) and also those of the lymphatic system. A medicine is injected into the vessels, which makes them shrink. It is used for children and young adults with vascular or lymphatic malformations. In adults, sclerotherapy is often used to treat spider veins, smaller varicose veins and hemorrhoids.

Endovascular Laser Treatment (EVLT)

EVLT treats varicose veins using an optical fiber that is inserted into the vein to be treated, and laser light, normally in the infrared portion of the spectrum, shines into the interior of the vein. This causes the vein to contract, and the optical fiber is slowly withdrawn.

Advanced Treatments for Renal Artery Stenosis and Peripheral Vascular Disease

Renal artery stenosis is the narrowing of the renal artery, most often caused by atherosclerosis or fibromuscular dysplasia. This narrowing of the renal artery can impede blood flow to the target kidney. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD)refers to the obstruction of large arteries not within the coronary, aortic arch vasculature, or brain. PVD can result from atherosclerosis, inflammatory processes leading to stenosis, an embolism, or thrombus formation.